Wednesday, March 23, 2011

GINISANG MUNGGO (Filipino Sautéed Mung Beans)

GINISANG MUNGGO © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

KULINARYA COOKING CLUB

 

Kulinarya’s theme for the month of March 2011 is Gulay (Vegetables).


Ginisang Munggo (Filipino Sautéed Mung Beans) is a wonderful “ulam” (dish that goes with rice) during rainy and cold days.  Dish starts with the classic Filipino holy food trinity which consist of garlic, onions and tomatoes and ends with the addition of chili leaves (I use bird’s eye chili leaves).  The chili leaves gives that peppery taste that blends well with the slightly thickened flavourful broth.

Fresh chili leaves is ideal but the frozen ones will do if you don’t have a chili plant readily available.  This is another tried and tested Cusinera’s recipe, give it a try and tell me if you like it.

 

GINISANG MUNGGO (Filipino Sautéed Mung Beans)

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 cup dry green mung beans

2 tspn cooking oil

3 cloves garlic, crushed

1 large onion, sliced

1 tomato, sliced

1/2 kg pork belly, sliced

4 tspn pork stock powder

2 tbspn+2tspn (40ml) patis

3-4 cups mung beans stock

pinch of ground pepper

1 (227g) packet of frozen chili leaves, defrosted and drained

*used U.S Measuring Cups & Spoons

GINISANG MUNGGO INGREDIENTS © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

 

COOKING PROCEDURE:

GINISANG MUNGGO PREP © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

~  Soak mung beans overnight, I usually cook this dish for next day dinner…after the mung beans are soaked overnight, rinse a couple of times to remove some of the husks, by gently rubbing the beans between the palms of your hands.

~    Drain mung beans and place in a medium saucepan, cover with enough water (approx. 3 cups).  Bring to boil and let it simmer, skim the froth buildup on top.  The mung beans will have that slightly “popped” appearance.  Strain the cooked mung beans and save the liquid stock, set aside.

GINISANG MUNGGO STEP1-4 © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

~  In a large pan, heat oil in medium heat, add garlic and onion, sauté till onion is translucent, then add sliced tomato and cook till it’s mushy.  Stir in pork and cook for a couple of minutes then add in your pork stock powder and ground pepper.

GINISANG MUNGGO STEP5-8 © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

~  Stir in your patis, lower your heat into medium and let it simmer till the meat is tender.  Add in your drained cooked mung beans, while mixing it in, mash the beans on the sides of the pan while stirring.  Once well combined, add in your mung beans stock, just enough to make it slightly thick but not runny.

GINISANG MUNGGO STEP9 © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

~  Bring to boil and simmer for a couple of minutes, occasionally stirring to avoid burning the bottom of the pot.

GINISANG MUNGGO STEP10 © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

~  Stir in your chili leaves and cook for a minute then turn off the heat.

GINISANG MUNGGO 2 © BUSOG! SARAP! 2011

BEST WITH:  Fried Fish and freshly cooked steamed rice.

NOTES:

  • If you’re lucky to have fresh chili leaves (siling labuyo/bird’s eye chili), use about 2 cups.
  • I didn’t provide set of minutes on the cooking time because I usually cook this dish by looking at its appearance and tasting it through the cooking stages.
  • When you boil your mung beans, don’t overdo it.  Overcooking the mung beans will make your final dish into mush and it doesn’t look appetizing.
  • Instead of pork belly, you can use dried shrimps or flaked dried fish.

16 comments:

  1. The chili leaves really make this dish special. Love munggo!

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  2. Your ginisang mongo made me hungry. I'm still in bed and just trying to get up... with eyes still blurry and this is the first thing that I see...now I'm hungry for mongo...

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  3. Ginisang Mungo is one of those versatile dish where you can put meat, fish, or shrimp and will adopt the flavor. What a yummy post Althea!

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  4. Looks delicious!

    Oh yes, fresh sili leaves add color, flavor, and nutrition to ginisang munggo...can't wait for summer so I can enjoy them.:)

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  5. Inspired me to cook the "lenticchie", my mom sent from Italy, italian for lentils, an assortment for munggo I guess! Tnx!
    -Joy of gastronomybyjoy!

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  6. This looks awesome! I've never cooked anything Filipino before, but the 'holy trinity' of onions, garlic, and tomatoes sounds perfect to me!

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  7. your photos are great! Makes me want to cook too! :)

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  8. This is the kinda food I eat, when I need a little bit of comfort. My mum knows just the right time to cook mongo. Its so delicious and good for you too. Nice dish for KCC...

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  9. oooh! I want of bowl of that with some hot steamy rice.

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  10. Yum!!! We love mongo so versatile...your versions sounds good. Question? i've had this question but didn't bother to ask anybody 'til now. Since you mentioned of chili leaves..i always buy the frozen ones but can we use the leaves from the ones we plant like the sweet bell peppers or the jalapenos? I plant different kinds of peppers every summer but hasn't tried cooking them I always think that not all pepper leaves are edible! ;)

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  11. @Taga_Luto (Pia)~ That's a really good question!!! Thanks for bringing that one up, the one I usually use fresh for cooking is dahon nang siling labuyo (bird's eye chili leaves)and I guess the one we buy frozen would be the same variety. Here's a link I found: http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/1899623 advising about which is edible or not. Big advice was not to eat fresh leaves=)

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  12. we use dry malunggay leaves or spinach leaves here in Ireland. add boiled pork ribs makes the dish so good.

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  13. Thank you for this recipe! I am substituting pork for dried fish though! And adding a bit of coconut milk for depth of flavor, too!

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